Attachmate Verastream Transaction Integrator Guide

 

.NET Deployment Examples

The following three procedures are examples of less common deployment configurations and assume that you are familiar with the standard deployment process, and that you have configured your .NET environment for use with Verastream Transaction Integrator.

Example One

Client deployment is similar to the standard remote client deployment except that the remote object is not hosted in IIS and requires that you write your own application for hosting the remote interface.

To host a remote object in a custom application
  1. Copy task_name.dll, Interop.CICSCONNECTORPROXYSERVICELib.dll, Remotetask_nameServer.config and task_name.xml, to the development or server computer.

  2. Modify the configuration file to reflect your host requirements; TCP port, protocol, lifetime, object URL, as needed.

  3. Call RemotingConfiguration.Configure ( ) in your custom application.

    This tells the remoting framework to listen for incoming requests for the remote factory component, which is a server-activated singleton that can create instances of the remote object.

  4. Modify the client configuration file to correspond with the server configuration file.

  5. Develop your client application as described in the standard deployment process, except use the RemoteTestFactory to get an instance of the remote object.

Example Two

This example combines the standard .NET Web service deployment with the .NET remote object deployment process. In this example, the .NET Web service acts as a remote client for an interface hosted on another server. To implement this installation, you must install the Web service twice; once on the Web service computer, and again, on the host computer.

To deploy a Web service client using .NET Web Service (remote client) to a remote object hosted in IIS
  1. Open the wwwroot\task_name\Web.config file on the Web service computer and remove the complete <system.runtime.remoting> section of the file, replacing it with the following XML code snippet:
    <appSettings>
      <add key="remote.configuration" value="Remotetask_nameClient.config"/>
    </appSettings>
    

    The remote.configuration value should be a relative path to the remoting configuration file.

  2. To configure the Web service to use remoting to forward Web service requests to the host server, modify the configuration file to point to the host server and to the correct virtual directory.

    Client applications reference the Web service to run stateless tasks via the host computer.

Example Three

This example is very similar to the second example, except the remote .NET object is not hosted in IIS and requires that you write your own application for hosting the remote interface.

To deploy a Web service client using .NET Web Service (remote client) to a remote object hosted in a custom application
  1. Copy task_name.dll, Interop.CICSCONNECTORPROXYSERVICELib.dll, Remotetask_nameServer.config and task_name.xml, to the development or server computer.

  2. Modify the configuration file to reflect your host requirements; TCP port, protocol, lifetime, object URL, as needed.

  3. Call RemotingConfiguration.Configure ( ) in your custom application.

    This tells the remoting framework to listen for incoming requests for the remote factory component, which is a server-activated singleton that can create instances of the remote object.

  4. Open the wwwroot\task_name\Web.config file on the Web service computer and remove the complete <system.runtime.remoting> section of the file, replacing it with the following XML code snippet:
    <appSettings>
      <add key="remote.configuration" value="Remotetask_nameClient.config"/>
    </appSettings>
    

    The remote.configuration value should be a relative path to the remoting configuration file.

  5. Modify the client configuration file to correspond with the server configuration file.

    The Web service should now use remoting to forward Web service requests to the custom application on the host server. Client applications reference the Web service WSDL file on the Web service computer to run stateless tasks via the custom application on the host machine.

Related Topics
Bullet Startup and Settings
Bullet Using .NET
Bullet Deploying to a Development Environment
  Attachmate