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Find Key

Getting there

This is a good starting point for any keyboard mapping activity. You may find that the keystroke that has required explicit mapping in previous X servers is already implicitly mapped in the Reflection X Advantage keymaps.

Locate

You can identify the key you are looking for in either of two ways:

  • Press a key.

    Click in the Press a key field, then press the key you want to investigate. You may also press a combination of keys that produce (compose) a character. If the key you pressed generates a character, the Results section displays the character that the key is producing, its X Keysym name if available, and whether it is already in the keyboard map's list of supported characters. The Results section also indicates if the key (or combination of keys) is explicitly mapped, has been defined as a keyboard shortcut, or is undefined.

  • Select key name.

    Locate the key by selecting it from the Select key name list to see the character this key is producing.

    Confirm the Key location; if the key is located on the Numeric keypad or with left and right instances, use this option to identify it.

Results

The Results box shows mapping information about the key in question.

  • You press or select a key that is in the list of supported characters. You'll see the character set as it is commonly displayed, the corresponding Unicode value, and the name of the corresponding X Keysym if one exists.

    If the character is supported and is producing the result you expect, no additional mapping is required.

    Click Go to definition to see its membership in the list of supported characters on the Characters tab.

  • You press, compose, or select a key that is not in the list of supported characters (such as pi, π).

    You'll see results that indicate the character is not in the list of supported characters. Click Create definition to add a new line to the list of Explicitly mapped keys with a NoSymbol Keysym. To change the mapping, click Change Mapped X Keysym in the right pane.

  • You press or select a key that is explicitly mapped (such as F12). You'll see the associated X Keysym.

    If the character is producing the X Keysym you expect, no additional mapping is required.

    Click Go to definition to see its location in the list of Explicitly mapped keys on the Map Key tab.

    If necessary, you can change the mapping by clicking Change Mapped X Keysym on the right.

  • You select a key that is not defined (such as F23 on many keyboards) that has not by default been explicitly mapped to an X Keysym).

    Click the Create definition button to add a new line to the list of Explicitly mapped keys with a NoSymbol Keysym. You can then change the mapping by clicking Change Mapped X Keysym on the right.

Use the Test Keyboard Behavior and Test Keymap Behavior options in Troubleshooting for additional analysis.

Related Topics

Keyboard Maps

Test Keyboard Behavior

Test Keymap Behavior

View Compiled Keymap

Work with Keyboard Maps

Use a Compose Sequence to Specify an X Keysym